"Agile" isn't about delivering every sprint

August 23, 2022
Frequently delivering software, but not considering feedback on how to improve, isn't agile.

I was recently having a conversation with someone who was asking if their team could be considered “agile.” As evidence to support the claim, they said “The team delivers working software every sprint.”

Of course, delivering frequently is usually a good thing. But is it enough to claim “agility?”

Of course not!

Agility is the ability to move quickly, or to adapt to change.

To truly claim agility, the team must constantly receive and incorporate feedback into their work and planning. Frequently delivering software is not sufficient. Although, it probably is necessary, to allow for feedback.

To make the point as blunt as I can:

  • Frequently delivering software that nobody uses isn’t agile.
  • Frequently delivering software that doesn’t work isn’t agile.
  • Frequently delivering software, but not considering feedback on how to improve, isn’t agile.
Share this

Related Content

No running!

By calling iterations "Sprints", Scrum implies a need for constant running. Don't be fooled.

Two modes of agile failure

I've heard both "Agile is only good for developers" and "Agile is only good for management". I think they're two modes of the same failure.

Scrum is great in theory, but "it will never work in the real world"

I think there are two "real worlds", and they often clash. One where Agile, Scrum, XP, and DevOps make perfect sense. Another where they don't.